winter – Wiktionary

winter - Wiktionary

English[edit]

Various kinds[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Center English winter, from Previous English winter, from Proto-Germanic *wintruz (winter). Cognate with West Frisian winter (winter), Dutch winter (winter), German Winter (winter), Danish, Swedish and Norwegian vinter (winter), Icelandic vetur (winter).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

winter (countable and uncountable, plural winters)

  1. Historically the fourth of the 4 seasons, usually thought to be being from December 23 to March 20 in continental areas of the Northern Hemisphere or the months of June, July and August within the Southern Hemisphere. It’s the time when the solar is lowest within the sky, leading to quick days, and the time of 12 months with the bottom atmospheric temperatures for the area.
    • a1420, The British Museum Further MS, 12,056, “Wounds difficult by the Dislocation of a Bone”, in Robert von Fleischhacker, editor, Lanfranc’s “Science of cirurgie.”[1], London: Ok. Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co, translation of authentic by Lanfranc of Milan, printed 1894, →ISBN, web page 63:

      Ne take midday hede to brynge togidere þe events of þe boon þat is to-broken or dislocate, til viij. daies ben goon in þe wyntir, & v. in þe somer; for þanne it schal make quytture, and be sikir from swellynge; & þanne brynge togidere þe brynkis eiþer þe disiuncture after þe techynge þat schal be seid in þe chapitle of algebra.

    • 1592, Shakespeare, Henry VI, Half 1:

      And after summer season evermore succeeds / Barren winter, together with his wrathful nipping chilly.

    • 1650, Thomas Browne, “Of the Cameleon”, in Pseudodoxia Epidemica: [], 2nd version, London: [] A. Miller, for Edw[ard] Dod and Nath[aniel] Ekins, [], OCLC 152706203, third ebook, web page 133:

      It can’t be denied it [the chameleon] is (if not the moſt of any) a really abſtemious animall, and ſuch as by reaſon of its frigidity, paucity of bloud, and latitancy within the winter (about which period the obſervations are sometimes made) will lengthy ſubſist with no viſible ſuſtentation.
    • 1785, William Cowper, “Tirocinium: or, A Evaluate of Colleges.” in The Poems of William Cowper, Vol. II., The Press of C. Whittingham (1822), web page 174:
      There shall he be taught, ere sixteen winters outdated, / That […]
    • 1897, William Morris, The Water of the Wondrous Isles, Vol. I, Longmans, Inexperienced and Co. (1914), web page 2:
      […] a lady, tall, and powerful of facet, of some thirty winters by seeming, […]
  2. (figuratively, poetic) The interval of decay, outdated age, demise, or the like.
  3. (countable, trend) Somebody with darkish pores and skin, eyes and hair, seen as finest suited to sure colours of clothes.
  4. (out of date) An equipment to be mounted on the entrance of a grate, to maintain a kettle heat, and so on.

Utilization notes[edit]

Word that season names usually are not capitalized in fashionable English except in the beginning of a sentence, for instance, I can not await spring to reach. Exceptions happen when the season is personified, as in Previous Man Winter, is used as a part of a reputation, as within the Winter Battle, or is used as a given title, as in Summer season Glau. That is in distinction to the times of the week and months of the 12 months, that are at all times capitalized (Thursday or September).

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived phrases[edit]

Associated phrases[edit]

Translations[edit]

See additionally[edit]

Verb[edit]

winter (third-person singular easy current winters, current participle wintering, easy previous and previous participle wintered)

  1. (intransitive) To spend the winter (in a specific place).

    After they retired, they hoped to winter in Florida.

  2. (transitive) To retailer one thing (as an example animals) someplace over winter to guard it from chilly.

Derived phrases[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch winter, from Center Dutch winter, from Previous Dutch winter, from Proto-Germanic *wintruz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

winter (plural winters)

  1. winter

Alemannic German[edit]

Various kinds[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Center Excessive German winter, from Previous Excessive German wintar, from Proto-Germanic *wintruz. Cognate with German Winter, Dutch winter, English winter, Swedish vinter.

Noun[edit]

winter m

  1. (Issime, Carcoforo) winter

See additionally[edit]

References[edit]

  • “winter” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Etymology[edit]

From Center Dutch winter, from Previous Dutch winter, from Proto-Germanic *wintruz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

winter m (plural winters, diminutive wintertje n)

  1. winter

Derived phrases[edit]

Descendants[edit]

See additionally[edit]


Center Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Previous Dutch winter, from Proto-Germanic *wintruz.

Noun[edit]

winter m

  1. winter

Inflection[edit]

This noun wants an inflection-table template.

Derived phrases[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Additional studying[edit]


Center English[edit]

Various kinds[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Previous English winter; in flip from Proto-Germanic *wintruz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

winter (plural winteres or winters)

  1. winter

Descendants[edit]

See additionally[edit]


Previous Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wintruz.

Noun[edit]

winter m

  1. winter

Inflection[edit]

This noun wants an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Additional studying[edit]

  • “winter”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Previous English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From earlier *wintr < *wintru, from Proto-Germanic *wintruz. Cognate with Previous Frisian winter, Previous Saxon wintar, Previous Dutch winter, Previous Excessive German wintar, Previous Norse vetr, Gothic (wintrus).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

winter m

  1. winter
  2. 12 months

Declension[edit]

Derived phrases[edit]

Descendants[edit]

See additionally[edit]


Etymology[edit]

From Center English winter, from Previous English winter, from Proto-Germanic *wintruz.

Noun[edit]

winter (plural winters)

  1. winter

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Previous Frisian winter, from Proto-Germanic *wintruz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

winter c (plural winters, diminutive winterke)

  1. winter

Derived phrases[edit]

Additional studying[edit]

  • “winter”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *