quarrel – Wiktionary

quarrel - Wiktionary

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Center English querele (altercation, dispute; argument, debate; armed fight; trial by fight; foundation for dispute, grievance; declare, authorized go well with; a lament; sickness) [and other forms],[1] from Anglo-Norman querele [and other forms] and Center French querele, querelle (altercation, dispute; foundation for dispute; aspect in a dispute; grievance; accusation; authorized go well with; lament; downside) (trendy French querelle), and from their etymon Latin querēla, querella (dispute; argument; grievance, grievance; authorized grievance; lament; sickness), from querī + -ēla, -ella (suffix forming nouns).[2]Querī is the current lively infinitive of queror (to complain; to bewail, lament; to be indignant), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱwes- (to puff; to sigh).

The phrase had changed Outdated English sacan (foundation for dispute) by 1340.

Noun[edit]

quarrel (plural quarrels)

  1. A dispute or heated argument (particularly one that’s verbal).
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:dispute

    We received right into a foolish quarrel about what meals to order.

    • 1851, Francis, Duc de la Rochefoucauld [i.e., François de La Rochefoucauld], [anonymous], transl., Ethical Reflections, Sentences and Maxims of Francis, Duc de la Rochefoucauld. [], New York, N.Y.: William Gowans, OCLC 9452642, quantity 523, web page 140:

      Quarrels wouldn’t final lengthy, if the fault was solely on one aspect.

    • 2016 June 17, John O’Sullivan, “U.Ok. Membership within the European Union”, in C-SPAN[1], 4:34 from the beginning, archived from the unique on 23 December 2020:

      All quarrels halt on the grave.

  2. Typically preceded by a type of to have: a foundation or floor of dispute or objection; a grievance; additionally, a sense or state of affairs of in poor health will and unhappiness attributable to this.

    A number of prospects within the store had some quarrels with us, so we known as for the supervisor.

    I’ve no quarrel along with her; it’s her companion whom I dislike.

    • c. 1601–1602, William Shakespeare, “Twelfe Evening, or VVhat You VVill”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Printed In accordance with the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, printed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act III, scene iv], web page 269, column 1:

      You miſtake ſir I’m ſure, no man hath any quarrell to me: my remembrance could be very free and cleere from any picture of offence accomplished to any man.

    • 1843 December 19, Charles Dickens, “Stave I. Marley’s Ghost.”, in A Christmas Carol. In Prose. Being a Ghost Story of Christmas, London: Chapman & Corridor, [], OCLC 55746801, pages 10–11:

      I’m sorry, with all my coronary heart, to seek out you so resolute. We now have by no means had any quarrel, to which I’ve been a celebration. However I’ve made the trial in homage to Christmas, and I will hold my Christmas humour to the final. So A Merry Christmas, uncle!

  3. (uncommon) A propensity to quarrel; quarrelsomeness.
    • c. 1603–1604, William Shakespeare, The Tragœdy of Othello, the Moore of Venice. [] (First Quarto), London: [] N[icholas] O[kes] for Thomas Walkley, [], printed 1622, OCLC 724111485, [Act II, scene iii], web page 30:

      If I can faſten however one cup vpon him, / With that which he hath drunke to nighttime already, / Hee’ll be as filled with quarrell and offence, / As my younger miſtris canine:— […]

    • 1605, Francis Bacon, “The First Booke”, in The Tvvoo Bookes of Francis Bacon. Of the Proficience and Aduancement of Studying, Diuine and Humane, London: [] Thomas Purfoot and Thomas Creede] for Henrie Tomes, [], OCLC 932932554, folio 32, verso:

      [A]ll beaſts and birds aſſembled; and forgetting their ſeuerall appetites; ſome of pray, ſome of sport, ſome of quarrell, ſtood all ſociably collectively liſtening vnto the ayres and accords of the Harpe; […]

Various kinds[edit]
Associated phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations beneath have to be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry format § Translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Center English querelen (to dispute, quarrel; to claim one’s claims; to insurgent) [and other forms], from querele (noun);[3] see etymology 1. Examine Anglo-Norman, Center French, and Outdated French quereler, quereller (to argue with, dispute; to criticize; to convey a authorized go well with) (trendy French quereller (to quarrel, squabble)).[4]

Verb[edit]

quarrel (third-person singular easy current quarrels, current participle (UK) quarrelling or (US) quarreling, easy previous and previous participle (UK) quarrelled or (US) quarreled)

  1. (intransitive, additionally figurative) To argue fiercely, contend, squabble; to stop to be on pleasant phrases, to fall out.
    • 1605, Francis Bacon, “The First Booke”, in The Tvvoo Bookes of Francis Bacon. Of the Proficience and Aduancement of Studying, Diuine and Humane, London: [] Thomas Purfoot and Thomas Creede] for Henrie Tomes, [], OCLC 932932554, folio 41, verso:

      [T]right here is little question however the facture or framing of the inward components, is as filled with distinction, because the outward, and in that, is the Cauſe Continent of many diſeaſes, which not be obſerued, they quarrell many instances with the humors which aren’t in fault, the fault being within the very body and Mechanicke of the parte, which can’t be remoued by drugs alteratiue, however muſt be accomodate and palliate by dyets and medicines acquainted.

    • 1672, William Temple, “An Essay upon the Unique and Nature of Authorities. []”, in Miscellanea. The First Half. […], third version, London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], and Awnsham and John Churchill, [], printed 1691, OCLC 1113628240, web page 61:

      Nay, they [animals] feed quietly collectively whereas there may be sufficient for all of them: Quarrel onely when it begins to fail; and when ’tis ended, they ſcatter to ſeek out new encounters. In addition to, thoſe known as ſociable, quarrel in starvation and in luſt, in addition to the others; […]

    • 1843 December 19, Charles Dickens, “Stave 4. The Final of the Spirits.”, in A Christmas Carol. In Prose. Being a Ghost Story of Christmas, London: Chapman & Corridor, [], OCLC 55746801, web page 147:

      I do know, my dears, that after we recollect how affected person and the way gentle he was; though he was a bit of, little youngster; we will not quarrel simply amongst ourselves, and overlook poor Tiny Tim in doing it.

  2. (intransitive) To search out fault; to cavil.

    to quarrel with one’s lot

    • 1680, Horace, Earl of Roscommon [i.e., Wentworth Dillon, 4th Earl of Roscommon], transl., Horace’s Artwork of Poetry. [], London: [] Henry Herringman [], OCLC 81670860, web page 24:

      Be not too rigidly Cenſorious, / A ſtring might jarr within the beſt Maſters hand, / And the moſt skilfull Archer miſs his intention; / However in a Poem elegantly writ, / I can’t quarrel with a ſlight miſtake, / Reminiscent of our Natures frailty might excuſe; […]

  3. (intransitive, out of date) Adopted by at: to disagree with; to take offence.
  4. (transitive, out of date besides Scotland) To argue or squabble with (somebody).
    • 1598, Benjamin Jonson [i.e., Ben Jonson], “Euery Man in His Hvmovr. []”, in The Workes of Ben Jonson (First Folio), London: [] Will[iam] Stansby, printed 1616, OCLC 960101342, Act II, scene i, web page 21:

      [T]hey would ſay […] that I had quarrell’d / My brother purpoſely, thereby to finde / An apt pretext, to baniſh them my houſe.

Conjugation[edit]
Various kinds[edit]
Derived phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations beneath have to be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry format § Translations.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Center English quarrel (bolt for an arbalest, crossbow, or siege engine; (figurative) seductive look, temptation to sin; needle (probably one sq. in cross-section); small (maybe square-shaped) opening in window tracery; a cushion (maybe square-shaped)) [and other forms],[5] from Anglo-Norman quarel, quarele, quarrel, Center French quarrel, and Outdated French quarel, quarrel, carrel (crossbow bolt; ground tile or paving stone (rectangular- or square-shaped); small glass pane for home windows) (trendy French carreau (crossbow bolt; a tile; windowpane; a sq.)), from Late Latin quarellus, quadrellus (crossbow bolt; paving stone; a tile), from Latin quadrum (a sq.; sq. part; common form or type) + -ellus (variant of -ulus (suffix forming diminutive nouns, indicating small measurement or youth)).[6]Quadrum is in the end derived from quattuor (4), from Proto-Indo-European *kʷetwóres (4).

Noun[edit]

quarrel (countable and uncountable, plural quarrels)

  1. (countable, archery, historic) An arrow or bolt for a crossbow or an arbalest (a late, massive kind of crossbow), historically with the pinnacle sq. in its cross part.
    Synonyms: carrel (out of date), quarry
    • 1600, [Torquato Tasso], “The Seuenth Booke of Godfrey of Bulloigne”, in Edward Fairefax [i.e., Edward Fairfax], transl., Godfrey of Bulloigne, or The Recouerie of Ierusalem. [], London: [] Ar[nold] Hatfield, for I[saac] Iaggard and M[atthew] Lownes, OCLC 940138160, stanza 103, web page 137:

      Twanged the ſtring, out flew the quarell lengthy, / And thru the ſubtile aire did ſinging pas, / It hit the knight the buckles wealthy amongst, / Wherewith his pretious girdle faſt’ned was, / It bruſed them and pearſt his hawberke ſtrong, / Some little blood downe trickled on the gras; […]

    • 1820, Walter Scott, chapter XIV, in Ivanhoe; a Romance. […] In Three Volumes, quantity III, Edinburgh: [] Archibald Constable and Co.; London: Hurst, Robinson, and Co. [], OCLC 230694662, web page 281:

      Right here be two arblasts, comrade, with windlaces and quarrells—to the barbican with you, and see you drive every bolt via a Saxon mind.

    • 1829 January–July, [Edward Augustus Kendall], “Illustrations of Historical past. Archery.”, in The Olio; or Museum of Leisure, quantity III, London: [] Shackell and Carfrae [for] Joseph Shackell, [], OCLC 985507367, web page 174, column 2:

      The small cross-bow, known as the arbalet or arbalest, is claimed to have been invented by the Sicilians. It was carried by the foot-soldiers, and when used was charged with a quarrel or bar-bolt, that’s, a small arrow with a flat head, considered one of which occasioned the demise of Harold [Godwinson] on the battle of Hastings, […]
    • 1891, A[rthur] Conan Doyle, “How the Yellow Cog Fought the Two Rover Galleys”, in The White Firm [], quantity II, London: Smith, Elder, & Co., [], OCLC https://1152655608, web page 71:

      “What was that?” he requested, as a hissing, sharp-drawn voice appeared to whisper in his ear. The steersman smiled, and pointed along with his foot to the place a brief heavy cross-bow quarrel caught quivering within the boards.

  2. (countable, structure) A diamond- or square-shaped piece of glass forming a part of a lattice window.
    Synonym: quarry
  3. (countable, Northern England, structure) A sq. tile; a quarry tile; (uncountable) such tiles collectively.
    Synonym: quarry (archaic)
  4. (countable, out of date, uncommon) A reducing instrument or chisel with a diamond- or square-shaped finish.
  5. (countable, structure, out of date) A small square-shaped opening in window tracery.
Associated phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “querē̆le, n.” in MED On-line, Ann Arbor, Mich.: College of Michigan, 2007.
  2. ^ “quarrel, n.2”, in OED On-line Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford College Press, December 2007.; “quarrel1, n.” in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford College Press.
  3. ^ “querē̆len, v.” in MED On-line, Ann Arbor, Mich.: College of Michigan, 2007.
  4. ^ “quarrel, v.”, in OED On-line Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford College Press, December 2007; “quarrel1, v.” in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford College Press.
  5. ^ “quarrel, n.(1)” in MED On-line, Ann Arbor, Mich.: College of Michigan, 2007.
  6. ^ “quarrel, n.1”, in OED On-line Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford College Press, December 2007; “quarry2, n.” in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford College Press.

Additional studying[edit]

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