fly – Wiktionary

fly - Wiktionary

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Center English flye, flie, from Previous English flȳġe, flēoge (a fly), from Proto-Germanic *fleugǭ (a fly), from Proto-Indo-European *plewk- (to fly). Cognate with Scots flee, Saterland Frisian Fljooge, Dutch vlieg, German Low German Fleeg, German Fliege, Danish flue, Norwegian Bokmål flue, Norwegian Nynorsk fluge, Swedish fluga, Icelandic fluga.

Noun[edit]

fly (plural flies)

  1. (zoology) Any insect of the order Diptera; characterised by having two wings (apart from some wingless species), additionally referred to as true flies.
    • 2012 January 1, Douglas Larson, “Runaway Devils Lake”, in American Scientist, quantity 100, no 1, web page 46:

      Devils Lake is the place I started my profession as a limnologist in 1964, finding out the lake’s neotenic salamanders and chironomids, or midge flies. […] The Devils Lake Basin is an endorheic, or closed, basin overlaying about 9,800 sq. kilometers in northeastern North Dakota.

  2. (non-technical) Particularly, any of the bugs of the household Muscidae, such because the widespread housefly (different households of Diptera embrace mosquitoes and midges).
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 5, in Mr. Pratt’s Sufferers:

      If you’re nicely sufficient off so’s you do not have to stress about something however your heft or your illnesses you start to get queer, I suppose. And the queerer the treatment for these ailings the larger the attraction. A spot just like the Proper Livers’ Relaxation was certain to attract freaks, similar as molasses attracts flies.

  3. Any related, however unrelated insect akin to dragonfly or butterfly.
  4. (fishing) A light-weight fishing lure resembling an insect.
  5. (weightlifting) A chest train carried out by shifting prolonged arms from the perimeters to in entrance of the chest. (additionally flye)
  6. (out of date) A witch’s acquainted.
  7. (out of date) A parasite.
    • 1636, “The Bashful Lover”, in Gifford, William, editor, The Performs of Philip Massinger[1], Act 1, Scene 1, revealed 1845, web page 470:

      The fly that performs too close to the flame burns in it.

  8. (swimming) The butterfly stroke (plural is often flys)
  9. (preceded by particular article) A easy dance by which the fingers are shaken within the air, common within the 1960s.
Hyponyms[edit]
Derived phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations under have to be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry format § Translations.

Additional studying[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Center English flien, from Previous English flēogan, from Proto-Germanic *fleuganą (evaluate Saterland Frisian fljooge, Dutch vliegen, Low German flegen, German fliegen, Danish flyve, Norwegian Nynorsk flyga), from Proto-Indo-European *plewk- (*plew-k-, to fly) (evaluate Lithuanian plaũkti ‘to swim’), enlargement of *plew- (move). Extra at flee and move.

Verb[edit]

fly (third-person singular easy current flies, current participle flying, easy previous flew, previous participle flown)

  1. (intransitive) To journey by means of the air, one other fuel, or a vacuum, with out being involved with a grounded floor.

    Birds of passage fly to hotter areas because it will get colder in winter.

    The Concorde flew from Paris to New York quicker than every other passenger airplane.

    It takes about eleven hours to fly from Frankfurt to Hong Kong.

    The little fairy flew house on the again of her good friend, the enormous eagle.

  2. (transitive, intransitive, archaic, poetic) To flee, to flee (from).
    • Sleep flies the wretch.
    • c. 1604–1605, William Shakespeare, “All’s VVell, that Ends VVell”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Revealed In line with the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, revealed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act 3, scene ii]:

      to fly the favours of so good a king

    • c. 1597, William Shakespeare, “The Merry VViues of VVindsor”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Revealed In line with the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, revealed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act IV, scene iv], web page 56, column 1:

      [V]pon a ſodaine, / As Falſtaffe, ſhe, and I, are newly met, / Allow them to [children dressed like “urchins, ouphes and fairies”] from forth a ſaw-pit ruſh without delay / With ſome diffuſed ſong: Vpon their ſight / We two, in nice amazedneſſe will flye: []
    • 1667, John Milton, “E book 5”, in Paradise Misplaced. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: [] [Samuel Simmons], [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Misplaced in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:

      Fly, ere evil intercept thy flight.

    • 1954, J. R. R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring
      He staggered and fell, grasped vainly on the stone, and slid into the abyss. “Fly, you fools!” he cried, and was gone.

    Fly, my lord! The enemy are upon us!

  3. (transitive, ergative) To trigger to fly (journey or float within the air): to move by way of air or the like.
    • The courageous black flag I fly.
    • 2013 September 7, “On a shiny new wing”, in The Economist, quantity 408, quantity 8852:

      A solar-powered unmanned aerial system (a UAS, extra generally referred to as a drone) might fly lengthy, lonely missions that standard plane wouldn’t be able to.

    Charles Lindbergh flew his airplane The Spirit of St. Louis throughout the Atlantic ocean.

    Why don’t you go outdoors and fly kites, youngsters? The wind is simply good.

    Birds fly their prey to their nest to feed it to their younger.

    Every day the put up flies 1000’s of letters across the globe.

  4. (intransitive, colloquial, of a proposal, challenge or thought) To be accepted, come about or work out.

    Let’s have a look at if that concept flies.

    You recognize, I simply do not assume that is going to fly. Why do not you spend your time on one thing higher?

  5. (intransitive) To journey very quick, hasten.
    • 1645, John Milton, On Time
      Fly, envious Time, until thou run out thy race.
    • 1870, William Cullen Bryant (translator), The Iliad (initially by Homer)
      The darkish waves murmured because the ship flew on.
    • 2011 September 18, Ben Dirs, “Rugby World Cup 2011: England 41-10 Georgia”, in BBC Sport:

      After yet one more missed penalty by Kvirikashvili from bang in entrance of the posts, England scored once more, centre Tuilagi flying into the road and touching down below the bar.

  6. To maneuver immediately, or with violence; to do an act immediately or swiftly.

    a door flies open;  a bomb flies aside

    • 1859, Charles Dickens, The Haunted Home:

      And in respect of the good necessity there’s, my darling, for extra employments being inside the attain of Lady than our civilisation has as but assigned to her, don’t fly on the unlucky males, even these males who’re at first sight in your approach, as in the event that they had been the pure oppressors of your intercourse []

  7. (transitive, ergative) To show (a flag) on a flagpole.
  8. To hunt with a hawk.
    (Can we discover and add a citation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
Synonyms[edit]
  • (journey by means of air): soar, hover, wing, skim, glide, ascend, rise, float, aviate
  • (flee): escape, flee, abscond; see additionally Thesaurus:flee
  • (journey very quick): dart, flit; see additionally Thesaurus:transfer rapidly
  • (do an act immediately): hurry, zoom; see additionally Thesaurus:rush
Antonyms[edit]
Hyponyms[edit]
Derived phrases[edit]
Associated phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations under have to be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry format § Translations.

Noun[edit]

fly (plural flys or flies)

  1. (out of date) The motion of flying; flight.
  2. An act of flying.

    There was a great wind, so I made a decision to offer the kite a fly.

  3. (baseball) A fly ball.
  4. (now historic) A sort of small, quick carriage (generally pluralised flys).
    • 1897, Bram Stoker, Dracula, Folio Society 2008, web page 124:
      As we left the home in my fly, which had been ready, Van Helsing stated:— ‘Tonight I can sleep in peace […].’
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 16, in The Mirror and the Lamp:

      “[…] She takes the entire thing with determined seriousness. However the others are all simple and jovial—interested by the great fare that’s quickly to be eaten, concerning the employed fly, about something.”

    • 1924, Ford Madox Ford, Some Do Not…, Penguin 2012 (Parade’s Finish), web page 54:
      And, driving again within the fly, Macmaster stated to himself that you simply could not name Mrs. Duchemin extraordinary, at the very least.
  5. A bit of canvas that covers the opening on the entrance of a tent.
  6. (usually plural) A strip of fabric (generally hiding zippers or buttons) on the entrance of a pair of trousers, pants, underpants, bootees, and many others.
    Ha-ha! Your flies are undone!
    • February 2014 Y-Entrance Fly
      Y-Entrance is a registered trademark for a particular entrance fly turned the other way up to type a Y owned by Jockey® Worldwide. The primary Y-Entrance® transient was created by Jockey® greater than 70 years in the past.
    • June 2014 The Gap In Males’s Underwear: Identify And Goal
      Briefs got a gap within the entrance. The purpose of this opening (the ‘fly’) was to make it simpler to pee with garments on
  7. The free fringe of a flag.
  8. The horizontal size of a flag.
  9. (weightlifting) An train that entails huge opening and shutting of the arms perpendicular to the shoulders.
  10. The a part of a vane pointing the course from which the wind blows.
  11. (nautical) That a part of a compass on which the factors are marked; the compass card.
    (Can we discover and add a citation of Totten to this entry?)
  12. Two or extra vanes set on a revolving axis, to behave as a fanner, or to equalize or impede the movement of equipment by the resistance of the air, as within the putting a part of a clock.
  13. A heavy wheel, or cross arms with weights on the ends on a revolving axis, to manage or equalize the movement of equipment via its inertia, the place the ability communicated, or the resistance to be overcome, is variable, as within the steam engine or the coining press. See flywheel.
  14. (historic) A light-weight horse-drawn carriage that may be employed for transportation.
    • 1859, Wilkie Collins, The Lady in White:
      Can I get a fly, or a carriage of any type? Is it too late?
      I dismissed the fly a mile distant from the park, and getting my instructions from the motive force, proceeded on my own to the home.
    • 1861, Henry Mayhew and William Tuckniss, London Labour and the London Poor: A Cyclopœdia of the Situation and Earnings of People who Will Work, People who Can not Work, and People who Will Not Work, Quantity 3, p. 359:
      A glass coach, it might be as nicely to watch, is a carriage and pair employed by the day, and a fly a one-horse carriage employed in an identical method.
  15. In a knitting machine, the piece hinged to the needle, which holds the engaged loop in place whereas the needle is penetrating one other loop; a latch.
    (Can we discover and add a citation of Knight to this entry?)
  16. The pair of arms revolving across the bobbin, in a spinning wheel or spinning body, to twist the yarn.
  17. (weaving) A shuttle pushed by means of the shed by a blow or jerk.
    (Can we discover and add a citation of Knight to this entry?)
  18. (printing, historic) The one who took the printed sheets from the press.
  19. (printing, historic) A vibrating body with fingers, connected to an influence printing press for doing the identical work.
  20. One of many higher screens of a stage in a theatre.
  21. (cotton manufacture) waste cotton
Derived phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

fly (third-person singular easy current flies, current participle flying, easy previous and previous participle flied)

  1. (intransitive, baseball) To hit a fly ball; to hit a fly ball that’s caught for an out. Examine floor (verb) and line (verb).
    Jones flied to proper in his final at-bat.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Origin unsure; most likely from the verb or noun.

Adjective[edit]

fly (comparative flier, superlative fliest)

  1. (slang, dated) Fast-witted, alert, mentally sharp.
    • 1854, Charles Dickens, “Family Phrases”, in Arcadia[2], quantity 7, web page 381:

      be assured, O man of sin—pilferer of small wares and petty larcener—that there’s an eye fixed inside keenly glancing from some loophole contrived between accordions and tin breastplates that watches your each motion, and is “fly,”— to make use of a time period peculiarly understandable to dishonest minds—to the slightest gesture of unlawful conveyancing.

  2. (slang) Properly dressed, good in look; in type, cool.

    He is fairly fly.

    • 1888, Frederick Thickstun Clark, A Mexican Lady[3], web page 270:

      when Ortega bought mounted up in his fly duds like that, an ord’nary man’s overcoat would not make ‘im a pair o’ socks.

    • 2001 September 1, “Tremendous Fly”, in Vibe[4], quantity 9, quantity 9, web page 252:

      Starring the light-skinned Ron O’Neal together with his shoulder-length perm and fly threads, Tremendous Fly exudes a way of black delight as O’Neal bucks the dope sport, dismisses his white girlfriend, and beats The Man at his personal hustle.

    • 2012, Lindy West, Dan Savage, Christopher Frizzelle, How you can Be a Particular person: The Stranger’s Information to Faculty, Intercourse, Intoxicants, Tacos, and Life Itself[5]:

      How NOT to Fb / [] no bare footage, no deep feelings (awkward), no tagging a bunch of individuals in an image of some fly Nikes, no making dinner plans (simply use a PHONE).

    • 2019, “Balenciaga”, carried out by Princess Nokia:

      I am so fly, I do not even attempt / I get so excessive, I can contact the sky / Costume for myself, I do not gown for hype / I gown for myself, you gown for the likes

  3. (slang) Stunning; displaying bodily magnificence.
    • 1991, “Busy Doin Nuthin”, in I Want a Haircut, carried out by Biz Markie:

      Phrase is bond she seemed divine, she seemed as fly as might be
      I believed she was totally different trigger she was by herself
      She seemed actual healthful, and in good bodily well being

    • 1994, “Reminiscence Lane (Sittin’ in da Park)”, in Illmatic, carried out by Nas:

      I rap for listeners, blunt heads, fly women and prisoners

Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Associated to German Flügel (a wing), Dutch vleugel (a wing), Swedish flygel (a wing).

Noun[edit]

fly (plural flies)

  1. (rural, Scotland, Northern England) A wing.

    The bullet barely grazed the wild fowl’s fly.

References[edit]


Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

An abbreviation of flyvemaskine, after Norwegian fly and Swedish flyg.

Noun[edit]

fly n (singular particular flyet, plural indefinite fly)

  1. airplane
Inflection[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Previous Norse flýja (to flee), from Proto-Germanic *fleuhaną, cognate with English flee, German fliehen, Dutch vlieden.

Verb[edit]

fly (current flyr or flyer, previous tense flyede, previous participle flyet)

  1. (archaic) to flee
  2. (archaic) to shun
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Center Low German vlī(g)en (to stack, type out), cognate with Dutch vlijen (to position). Origin unknown.

Verb[edit]

fly (current flyr or flyer, previous tense flyede, previous participle flyet)

  1. (archaic) handy, give
Inflection[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Brief type of flygemaskin

Noun[edit]

fly n (particular singular flyet, indefinite plural fly, particular plural flya or flyene)

  1. aircraft, aeroplane (UK), airplane (US), plane
Derived phrases[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Previous Norse fljúga

Different types[edit]

Verb[edit]

fly (crucial fly, current tense flyr, easy previous fløy, previous participle flydd or fløyet)

  1. to fly
Derived phrases[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Clipping of flygemaskin (flying machine).

Noun[edit]

fly n (particular singular flyet, indefinite plural fly, particular plural flya)

  1. aircraft, aeroplane (UK), airplane (US), plane
    Skunda deg, elles misser du flyet ditt!

    Hurry up, otherwise you’ll miss your aircraft!
Derived phrases[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Previous Norse fljúga, from Proto-Germanic *fleuganą.

Different types[edit]

Verb[edit]

fly (current tense flyr or flyg, previous tense flaug, supine floge, previous participle flogen, current participle flygande, crucial fly or flyg)

  1. (intransitive) to fly (to journey by means of air, one other fuel or a vacuum, with out being involved with a grounded floor)
  2. (transitive, ergative) to trigger to fly: to move by way of air or the like
  3. (intransitive) to run, transfer quick
  4. (intransitive, mainly about livestock) to be in warmth, rutting
Derived phrases[edit]
Associated phrases[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fly (masculine and female fly, neuter flytt, particular singular and plural flye, comparative flyare, indefinite superlative flyast, particular superlative flyaste)

  1. very steep

Noun[edit]

fly n (particular singular flyet, indefinite plural fly, particular plural flya)

  1. a really steep cliff

Etymology 3[edit]

From Previous Norse flýja, from Proto-Germanic *fleuhaną.

Verb[edit]

fly (current tense flyr, previous tense flydde, previous participle flydd/flytt, passive infinitive flyast, current participle flyande, crucial fly)

  1. (intransitive) to flee; flee; run away
    Synonym: flykte
  2. (transitive) to flee from

Etymology 4[edit]

Clipping of flygande (flying), current participle of fly.

Adverb[edit]

fly

  1. (colloquial) Used as an intensifier for the phrase forbanna
    Han vart fly forbanna.

Etymology 5[edit]

Consult with flye n (flying insect) and English fly.

Noun[edit]

fly f (particular singular flya, indefinite plural flyer, particular plural flyene)

  1. small (flying) insect
  2. (fishing) bait

Etymology 6[edit]

Noun[edit]

fly f (particular singular flya, indefinite plural flyer, particular plural flyene)

  1. specks
    Synonyms: rusk, grann

Etymology 7[edit]

Noun[edit]

fly f (particular singular flya, indefinite plural flyer, particular plural flyene)

  1. mountain plateau
    Synonyms: vidde, fjellvidde

Etymology 8[edit]

Of unsure origin, although could also be associated to flyta (to drift).

Noun[edit]

fly n (particular singular flyet, indefinite plural fly, particular plural flya)

  1. sump

Etymology 9[edit]

Associated to, or probably a doublet of flø, from Previous Norse flór.

Adjective[edit]

fly (masculine and female fly, neuter flytt, particular singular and plural flye, comparative flyare, indefinite superlative flyast, particular superlative flyaste)

  1. tepid

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Adjective[edit]

fly

  1. (slang, mainly Doric) sneaky
    • 2013 November 12, Charley Buchan, Karen Barrett-Ayres, “A Fly Cup”, in Doric Voices[6], Robert Gordon College:

      Noo then, fa’s for a fly cup?

      Now then, who’s for a sneaky cup?

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Previous Swedish flȳia, flȳa, from Previous Norse flýja, from Proto-Germanic *fleuhaną.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fly (current flyr, preterite flydde, supine flytt, crucial fly)

  1. to flee, to run away, to flee
    Fångarna försökte fly från fängelset.

    The prisoners tried to escape from jail.
    Med tårarna strömmande ned för sina kinder flydde hon undan de andra tjejernas glåpord.

    With tears streaming down her cheeks, she fled the taunting phrases of the opposite ladies.
  2. to go, to go by (of time)
    • 1964, Gunnel Vallquist, title of the brand new Swedish translation of Proust’s À la recherche du temps perdu
      På spaning efter den tid som flytt

      In Search of Misplaced Time
    • 1965, Sven-Ingvars, Börja om från början
      Varför ska man sörja tider som har flytt?

      Why ought to one really feel sorry for instances which have handed?

Conjugation[edit]

Associated phrases[edit]


Westrobothnian[edit]

Verb[edit]

fly

  1. to ship, handy
    fly me sɑksa

    hand me the scissors

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